Working. Making Money. Building Wealth.

Work. 95% of eligible Americans do it.

I started working for minimum wage at age 13. Before that, I worked for my Dad helping out on his job sites. Sweeping floors, carrying trash, but I always wanted to hammer or saw something too. Apparently power tools aren’t for kids under 10 years old. For my mom, it was working at the convenience stores she managed re-stocking shelves, and yes once again, taking out the trash. Oh, and re-stocking the cold drinks in the cooler. That should have been called torture! My hands got so cold!

Eventually, I graduated up from family jobs to a real job at the local grocery store sacking groceries. I still think that was one of the most fun jobs I’ve had. Sacking groceries, checkout lines, sweeping and mopping floors, restocking shelves, and helping people to their car with their groceries. Once again, it paid minimum wage or close to it.

After graduating from high school, it was time for college, and I was a bit more ambitious with what I wanted to earn in compensation. I moved up from minimum wage to $7 per hour while working for RPS (Roadway Package Systems), and then it happened. I landed a $15 per hour summer job with P.I.E. freight company! My world was rocked. I was making $600 a week! Along with that jump came a shift in my expectations and what was possible with my income. As a young man and college student, I had reached a break through!

So many of us go through a similar experience of working and making money. Thinking in terms of single dollar increment raises. A $1 per hour raise blows us away! After I got out of college and landed my first engineering job, that’s exactly the world I lived in. Once I knew I could earn $15 per hour, I knew one day I could do it again, and I did. But sadly, I couldn’t imagine anything much more than that. $15 per hour is roughly $30,000 on a 40 hour a week job. $20 per hour is $40,000 per year. $30 is $60,000 per year. Hourly Rate x 2000 hours of work.

So ask yourself this question, how much money do you want make for your 2000 hours of work per year? $40,000? $60,000? What about $100,000? What about $250,000? More?

The idea of making $250,000 per year may sound ridiculous to many people who read this article, but it is doable. Lots of people are doing it. Why not you?

We can all work to make money, but working doesn’t have to be the only way we make money. Many people make money by developing multiple income streams. They start with a typical job, and develop supplemental income streams

Making More Money

So you want to make more money? I applaud you. Don’t settle for the status quo, every day routine. Expand yourself.

  1. Grow yourself. If you want to make more money, you have to grow yourself. You have to make yourself more valuable by learning and increasing the value you offer.
  2. Look for opportunities at work. Can you contribute at work on a higher level? Sometimes opportunities are right around the corner. Don’t wait for opportunity to find you, go looking for it.
  3. Be excellent. Do the best work you possibly can. Sloppy work won’t get you very far, and it definitely won’t make a you a highly valuable and top paid employee. Be excellent. Do excellent work, and money will flow your way.
  4. Might be time for a job change. Many people get stuck in a lower paying job because they get comfortable. You work the same hours whether you get paid $30,000 or $120,000. Why stay with a company that can’t pay you or won’t pay you more for your work? Think about this. If you make, $60,000 a year, that’s like working 2 years for $30,000 a year! Land a $120,000 a year job and thats 4 years at $30,000 or 2 years at $60,000. Don’t get stuck in a low paying comfortable job.
  5. Develop income streams outside your typical JOB. Developing multiple income streams can let you keep your day job and make extra money to help build wealth faster. You can start with side work, a hobby, or even a small business on the side. Millions of people are doing what is called an MLM (Multi-Level Marketing) or Direct Sales. While MLM has a bad stigma in the United States, millions of people are successful in using to make money to supplement or even replace their entire income.
  6. Rental Properties. Rental properties and real estate are historically a great income stream. Whether you’re flipping properties or buying a few rentals, you can make money in real estate. Starting with a low cost townhome rental can get you going or even renting out a room in your house. AirBNB makes it easy to find short term renters or if you like stability and a little more security, look for a longer term renter.

If you want to build wealth, multiple income streams will help you do it. I waited a bit longer than I should have to create my own multiple income streams, but I’m working hard to put them in place now. We have purchased 2 rental properties over the last 2 years. Now I’m engaged with Wealth Generators , a good MLM based around investing and helping people build wealth. They’ve created some investing tools, financial training and money management tools to help everyday people succeed with money. It’s right up my personal finance and wealth building alley. For more information on Wealth Generators, drop me an email. tony @ tonybradshaw.com

If you want to go the MLM route, there are tons of good companies like Melaleuca, Advocare, Kyani and others. If you are interested in one of these programs, I’ll be glad to connect you to some very awesome people. Drop me an email. tony @ tonybradshaw.com

How much more do you want to make per year and put towards your wealth building? $6,000 per year? $10,000 per year? $100,000 or more perhaps? It’s all up to you and what you choose do. The more money you can sock away into your passive investments or building your income streams, the faster you will become a millionaire and the more people you will be able to help with the wealth you’ve built.

 

 

A 2017 Reading List for Success

Whenever I go through the airport heading to my flight, I make it a point to walk through the bookstore. 90% of the time something will catch my eye and once again they have me hooked. I’m a sucker for a good book.

However on this particular morning while heading out to Salt Lake City for a cold snowy week, I reached a conundrum. I found a particularly enticing assortment of books. While I tried to narrow my selection down to just one book, I couldn’t. My next choice was to expand to two or three books which I quickly eliminated as a viable option seeing as I had three books witb me already. Hmmm. Such an unfortunate predicament.

Finally, it occurred to me. Any one of these books would be an amazing read, and seeing as I had only read two of the books, why not make this book display my reading list for the year? And thus was born my business reading list for 2017. I say my business reading list because I have various other spiritual, adventure, and scientific books already started.

As I found this shelf to be filled with very relevant topics for my new adventures in 2017, I felt it only fitting to share the list with others. Enjoy.

Strategic Planning

I love planning. Absolutely, love it. I don’t think I realized how much I enjoyed planning until more recently as my job responsibilities have changed. I enjoy looking into the future to create vision and devising plans on how to achieve that vision. Thinking through the details, all the angles, all the possibilities. It excites me.

I guess I should have realized this sooner and worked to leverage that side of who I am. Even as a youngster the signs were there. Learning to play chess and enjoying the complex strategy needed to win. Visualizing what moves your opponent would make and what your options would be. Some matches even able to predict 7-10 moves ahead what my opponent would be doing. Other areas where planning tendencies manifested included putting together neighborhood fishing, basketball, and football tournaments.

In June, I transitioned from CIO to COO. My new set of responsibilities include Strategic Planning, PMO, and Internal Communications. While I’ve lead Strategic Planning for many of our Ramsey Solution digital efforts over the past 15 years, I’m now leading the company’s entire strategic planning efforts, and it is a challenge.

I’m excited about the progress we’ve made this year in developing some process and structure around our top level planning. In the past, we have been a bottom up very entrepreneurial culture. While we are still maintaining that very entrepreneurial bent, we are balancing it with some top level direction that connects our many businesses and products in a stronger way. With this change, we hope to reach even more people and impact their lives.

As I’ve reached out to other leaders at companies of all sizes, it has been interesting to discover how many companies don’t do any top level strategic planning. I’ve been asked several times from companies smaller than ours to several times larger than us, “are you getting any value out of strategic planning? What are you doing?”

For those of you who are interested, here a few of the resources that are influencing our strategic planning efforts.

Patterson’s StratOp Process

Traction – EOS (Entreprenuerial Operating System) by Gino Wickman

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The Rockerfeller Habits by Verne Harnish
Additional Resources

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Strategic Planning and Innovation Summit

 

A New Breed of CIO

Technology is changing. The way companies use technology is changing.

The past – technology teams and CIOs relied upon by the organization as service level. Translation: Business leaders come up with ideas. Business leaders tell the technology department what they want or need. The technology team fulfills those requests. Very service level driven.

The future – technology teams and CIOs are peers with the other top level leaders in the organization. Translation: CIOs work alongside top level leaders to define strategy for the organization. CIOs make the transition to helping the company navigate the digital world. Online business, mobile, etc. CIOs that fail to make the transition will fail to bring the necessary business value and ultimately fail as the “new breed of CIO.”

This article from Tech Republic and David Nichols does a fabulous job laying all of this out.

Tech Republic – Digital CIOs

My Time at SXSW 2014

One more session and I’ll be leaving SXSW for the trip back to wonderful Nashville, TN. This was my second time to SXSW in 3 years. One the last trip, we brought along several members of our development team. With this trip we tried a new approach and brought along the leaders of our Digital Strategies Team. 2 from Development. 2 from Creative. 3 from Marketing. 2 from Digital Business. It was a wise decision.

While SXSW has been entertaining, informational and fun, the time with our leadership team has by far been the best value from the trip. A lot of companies deal with dysfunction amoung these groups and teams. At Dave Ramsey’s Organization, we work really hard not to let this happen. We actually like and enjoy working with each other. It’s really like working within a “positive” family experience. This makes our work environment extremely fun. One of the byproducts is how excited everyone is to work on projects together and to help improve and make things working and function better. Always striving for improvement. Sometimes that improvement is slow in coming, but rest assured, it is coming.

As for the rest of SXSW, it started a bit slower than my last visit. The weather was cold and rainy. Yuck! The sessions were rather weak. By day 3, things started picking up. The weather improved and probably unrelated, so did the quality of the sessions. Perhaps I just did a better job choosing. 🙂 In in case, I’ve picked up some really good ideas, and sparked my digital creative juices flowing again. Sometimes, I probably get a little too focused on work and need a break like this to pull me out of the weeds. It allows me an opportunity to see more clearly some of the things we need to focus on for improvement.

Thanks SXSW.

Josh James and DOMO

As I was perusing the social scene this evening, I began checking up on a few of my favorite online companies and their CEOs. LinkedIn‘s Jeff Weiner, and Yahoo‘s Marissa Mayer. I couldn’t help but notice Marissa’s 400,000 twitter followers and Jeff’s 60,000. I began pondering my own social footprint. Truthfully, I’ve not been interested in creating a huge Twitter or Facebook following for myself as is evidenced by my pitiful 862 followers who see sporadic tweets from me on a random out of the blue basis. However, as I navigated through LinkedIn checking to see if Marissa had somehow miraculously accepted my invitation to connect, I was greeted by a BI advertisement targeting CIOs, and as you may know, I am a CIO. I was enticed, and before I knew what was happening, I clicked the link. Yes. I fell for one of the same marketing tactics I use on others. Obviously, it’s a very effective marketing tactic, but that isn’t the story.

After clicking the link, I was greeted by a wonderful landing page at DOMO. DOMO, if you don’t know, is run by Josh James, the former CEO of Omniture, one of my favorite web companies. Josh did some wonderful things over at Omniture, and after leaving Adobe/Omniture, he landed at DOMO as a major investor and the new CEO. In typical Josh fashion, DOMO has really stepped up its visibility. Josh’s teams have done some very good things with marketing over the years. While at Omniture, one of those was to buy and use CMO.com to attract and support CMOs. Now, I see with DOMO, Josh has done it again with CEO.com, and I have to ask, why didn’t someone else do this? It’s a simple yet brilliant strategy.

Way to go Josh! And, if one of your guys can make it down to Nashville for our October CIO Peer to Peer meeting (this month covering DataWarehousing and BI Reporting), that would be great.

Another Wonderful Day at the CIO Leadership Event

Today was fabulous! The day began with some discussion on gamification, then rolled into a great session from Tom Wilson, CEO of Allstate. Probably my favorite session of the day was from David Williams, CEO of Deloitte Financial Services.

The conference is a bit lite on vendors which is a good thing, but the vendors that are present have been very helpful. CareerBuilder, Dimension Data, Dell, Service Now, and Microsoft.

Looking forward to another exciting day tomorrow!

Becoming a Better CIO

This weekend I’m experiencing the wonderful weather of Boca Raton, Florida. However, it’s not all fun and games unless of course you consider that I love my job and the company I have the pleasure of working at for the last 12 years.

Since being appointed as the company’s first ever CIO in January 2012, I’ve been on a quest to grow my abilities to better serve the company. We’re very dependent on technology. It permeates every project, business and initiative that we undertake. That’s the driving factor of attending this year’s CIO Leadership Event put on by CIO magazine.

Today was just a warm up. As with any event, networking is a huge plus. The amount of knowledge you gain from a simple conversation is amazing. Playing golf with Dale from Blue Cross Blue Shield in Birmingham, Alabama, Shad from Elavon, and Bryan from Dimension Data was a great start to the day. Not sure I enjoyed getting up at 6:15 or being the worst golfer on our team, but at least I ended the game well by having the longest drive on the last hole! Other notable persons I was able to connect with today included Houston Ross with ING Life Insurance and Geoff Sinn with Dimension Data, a cloud solutions provider.

In the afternoon, I had the opportunity to attend a Cloud Maturity discussion facilitated by Dimension Data. About 30 people were in attendance with several CIOs, some directors from various verticals including B2B, Insurance, Education, and even the LPGA was in attendance. I didn’t walk away with any earth shattering information, but I did walk away with a great contact and possible future vendor in Dimension Data.

Let’s see what tomorrow brings.

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Great Mobile and Digital Info from Mary Meeker

I’m spending some time working on mobile and digital strategy today and came across some work by Mary Meeker. After discovering Mary a few years ago at the Web 2.0 Summit, her research has become some of my favorite to read.

If you’re working in the digital space, this is some great material

Mary Meeker – Internet Trends, 05/2012

Economic Factors in the USA, USA, Inc. Presentation by Mary Meeker, July 2011

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Leadership Lessons from Bill Hybels

Great leadership ability is not something you attain. It’s something you constantly work to improve and refine. I find it extremely interesting that the best leaders are always looking for ways to improve. They never see leadership from the lens of “I’ve arrived.”

On August 9th and 10th, our leadership team was able to attend the Willowcreek Leadership Summit. As usual, the summit was phenomenal event. While I was unable to attend the full two days, I was very fortunate to fit a couple of the key speakers into my busy schedule. One of my favorites was Bill Hybels. Rather than taking time to write up my own summary, I’m taking the easy way out and cheating a little. Enjoy these fabulous summaries. 🙂

Mark Sanborn

Mark Waltz

Lifepoint Leadership